MattAndJojang's Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘Thomas Merton

One Dark Night

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One Dark Night is John Michael Talbot’s translation of St. John of the Cross’s poem Dark Night of the Soul, which he set into music. Together with the Spiritual Canticle, both poems are considered masterpieces of Spanish poetry.

In fact, St. John of the Cross is considered as Spain’s greatest poet.

Ironically, he didn’t set out to be a poet. He was first of all a saint and a mystic. He wrote his poems as an expression of his intense love God, as well as the basis of his spiritual teaching, which he later put into writing.

His poems, as well as his spiritual teachings are well known for its depth and beauty.

Throughout the centuries, his poems and spiritual writings has influenced authors, artists, theologians, philosophers, and spiritual seekers like T.S. Eliot, Thomas Merton, Jacques Maritain, and Salvador Dali. Pope John Paul II wrote his doctoral dissertation  on the mystical theology of St. John of the Cross.

Here’s John Michael Talbot’s translation, which also serve as the lyrics of the song One Dark Night:

One dark night
Fired with love’s urgent longings
Ah, the sheer grace
In the darkness
I went out unseen
My house being all now still

In the darkness
Secured by love’s secret ladder
Disguised
Oh, the sheer grace
In the darkness
And in my concealment
My house being all now still

On that glad night
In the secret, for no one saw me
Nor did I see any other thing at all
With no other light to guide me
Than the light burning in my heart

And this light guided me
More surely than the light of the noon
To where he lay waiting for me
Waiting for me
Him I knew so well
In a place where no one else appeared

Oh guiding night
A light more lovely than the dawn
A night that has united
Ever now
The Lover now with his beloved
Transforming two now into one

Upon my flowering breast
There he lay sleeping
Which I kept for him alone
And I embraced him
And I caressed him
In a breeze blowing from the forest

And when this breeze blew in from the forest
Blowing back our hair
He wounded my soul
With his gentle hand
Suspending all my senses

I abandoned, forgetting myself
Laying my face on my Beloved
All things ceasing, I went out from myself
To leave cares
Forgotten with the lilies of the field

–Matt

A Christmas Prayer

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 During Christmas services in the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, Palestine, by the American Colony Jerusalem Photo Department, between 1934 and 1939

During Christmas services in the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem, Palestine, by the American Colony Jerusalem Photo Department, between 1934 and 1939

A hauntingly beautiful Christmas prayer…

Your brightness is my darkness.
I know nothing of You and, by myself,
I cannot even imagine how to go about knowing You.
If I imagine You, I am mistaken.
If I understand You, I am deluded.
If I am conscious and certain I know You, I am crazy.
The darkness is enough.

—Thomas Merton, prayer before midnight mass at Christmas, 1941.

Written by MattAndJojang

December 25, 2014 at 7:59 pm

Finding God in All Things

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Fr. James Martin

Fr. James Martin

One thing that I and Fr. James Martin have in common is our love for Thomas Merton.

Armed with a prestigious Bachelor of Science degree in Economics from one of  the best business and Ivy League schools, University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, he was on his way to corporate success.

One day, however, after having a bad day at the office, he decided to watch TV. After flipping channels, his attention was grabbed by a PBS documentary on the life of Thomas Merton. It was a turning point in his life.

The documentary spoke to him in a way that made him decide to be a Jesuit priest.

Fast forward.

He’s been a Jesuit priest for 26 years and has become one of the most popular spiritual writers today.

On a personal note, Fr. James Martin is one of my and Jojang’s favorite authors. He writes most of the time about his personal experiences; that’s probably why most people could relate to him.

His simple, direct, and practical way of presenting spiritual truths is what makes his books relevant for our time.

Just recently he was interviewed in a podcast entitled Finding God in All Things. Krista Tippett, the host of the podcast, introduces him with these words:

Before Pope Francis, Fr. James Martin was perhaps the best known and loved Jesuit writing in American life. He’s followed the calling of the founder of the Jesuit order, St. Ignatius of Loyola, to “find God in all things” – and in 21st century forms, as editor of America magazine, but also as a wise and witty presence on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Stephen Colbert has proclaimed him the chaplain of “the Colbert Nation.” To delve into Fr. Martin’s way of being in the world is to discover the spiritual exercises St. Ignatius designed to be accessible to everyone more than six centuries ago. These underpinned the Jesuit way of “contemplation in action” and are now shaping the Vatican in a new age.

To listen to the podcast, click on the link below:

Finding God in All Things

— Matt

Written by MattAndJojang

December 22, 2014 at 11:30 am

A Zen Life – D.T. Suzuki

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A Zen Life

He’s probably the most culturally significant Japanese person, in international terms, in all of history.

—Gary Snyder

A Zen Life – D.T. Suzuki is a documentary about Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki, Zen philosopher and one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. He is considered to be the person who single-handedly introduced Zen Buddhism to the West.

After saying that Zen is impossible to describe, he proceeds to write more than a hundred books about Zen. Lynn White, professor of medieval history at Princeton (and later at Stanford), says:

It may well be that the publication of D.T. Suzuki’s first Essays in Zen Buddhism in 1927 will seem in future generations as great an intellectual event as William of Moerbeke’s Latin translations of Aristotle in the thirteenth century or Marsiglio Ficino’s of Plato in the fifteenth.

Aside from writing books, he also traveled and lectured around the world.

He influenced many of the great Western intellectual figures of the 20th century. Among those who admitted the impact of D.T. Suzuki on their work and thought are: the psychologist Carl Jung, the philosopher Martin Heidegger, the psychoanalyst Eric Fromm, the writer Jack Kerouac, the poet Allen Ginsberg, and the Catholic monk Thomas Merton.

Martin Heidegger admits:

If I understand [Dr. Suzuki] correctly, this is what I have been trying to say in all my writings.

On his deathbed Carl Jung was reading Charles Luk’s Ch’an and Zen Teachings: First Series. His secretary writes:

he was enthusiastic… When he read what Hsu Yun said, he sometimes felt as if he himself could have said exactly this! It was just ‘it’!

After meeting with D.T. Suzuki in New York, Thomas Merton writes in his journal:

These talks were very pleasant, profoundly important to me—to see and experience the fact that there really is a deep understanding between myself and this extraordinary, simple man whom I have been reading for about ten years with great attention.

The documentary is a vivid portrait of one of the most extraordinary intellectuals of the 20th century. It includes rare footages of D.T. Suzuki, as well as reminiscences of people he influenced.

To watch the trailer of the documentary click the link below:

A Zen Life – D.T. Suzuki

–Matt

Written by MattAndJojang

November 18, 2014 at 7:35 pm

What Are The Ten Books That Have Shaped You?

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Photo: samluce.com

Photo: samluce.com

List 10 books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take more than a few minutes, and don’t think too hard. It’s not about the ‘right book’ or great works of literature, just ones that have affected you in some way. Doesn’t have to be in order. Then share with 10 friends and me so I can see your list.

–Salman Azhar

Here’s my list:

1. How to Read a Book, Mortimer Adler

The book that taught me not only to make the most out of reading books, but also how to think critically.

The three main questions are: What is the whole book about and how are its parts related to that whole? What, in detail, does the book say and what does the author mean by what he says? And the third question is, Is it true, and what of it?

– Mortimer Adler

2. The Bible

As a Christian, I consider it as God’s word and the most important book in my life.

Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.

– Psalm 119:105

3. The Gateless Gate, Yamada Koun Roshi

An incisive commentary on the classic book of koans by the modern-day Zen Master, Yamada Roshi.

You will feel as though the whole universe has totally collapsed. Strange as it may seem, this experience has the power to free you from the agonies of the world. It emancipates you from anxiety over all worldly suffering. You feel as though the heavy burdens you have been carrying in mind and body have suddenly fallen away. It is a great surprise. The joy and happiness at that time are beyond all words, and there are no philosophies or theories attached to it. This is the enlightenment, the satori of Zen.

– Yamada Koun Roshi

4. The Complete Mystical Works of Meister Eckhart, Meister Eckhart

The book that contains the entire text of the vernacular talks of my favorite Christian mystic, Meister Eckhart.

The eye with which I see God is the same eye with which God sees me.

– Meister Eckhart

5. The Collected Works of St. John of the Cross, St. John of the Cross

A classic on contemplative spirituality by one of the greatest Christian mystics, St. John of the Cross.

My Beloved, the mountains,
And lonely wooded valleys,
Strange islands,
And resounding rivers,
The whistling of love-stirring breezes,
The tranquil night
At the time of the rising dawn,
Silent music,
Sounding solitude,
The supper that refreshes, and deepens love.

– St. John of the Cross

6. The Seven Storey Mountain, Thomas Merton

The autobiography of my favorite spiritual author and childhood hero, Thomas Merton. He was a great influence in my life.

The very contradictions in my life are in some ways signs of God’s mercy to me.

– Thomas Merton

7. The Silent Life, Thomas Merton

A book which describes the different Catholic contemplative religious orders.

I have only one desire, and that is the desire for solitude—to disappear into God, to be submerged in His peace, to be lost in the secret of His Face.

– Thomas Merton

8. New Seeds of Contemplation, Thomas Merton

A modern-day classic on contemplative prayer.

Contemplation is the highest expression of man’s intellectual and spiritual life. It is that life itself, fully awake, fully active, fully aware that it is alive. It is spiritual wonder. It is spontaneous awe at the sacredness of life, of being. It is gratitude for life, for awareness and for being. It is a vivid realization of the fact that life and being in us proceed from an invisible, transcendent and infinitely abundant Source.

– Thomas Merton

9. The Three Pillars of Zen, Philip Kapleau

One of the best books on Zen practice written by a Western Zen teacher.

The world is one interdependent Whole and each separate one of us is that Whole.

– Philip Kapleau

10. Christian Zen, William Johnston

A book on Zen meditation written from a Christian perspective by a Jesuit priest and missionary.

In the twenty years that I have spent in Japan – so meaningful and rich that this land is almost my land – I have had some contact with Zen, whether by sitting in Zen meditation or through dialogue with my Buddhist friends. All this has been tremendously enriching; it has deepened and broadened my Christian faith more than I can say… Contact with Zen… has opened up new vistas, teaching me that there are possibilities in Christianity I never dreamed of.

— William Johnston

— Matt

 

The Beauty In Ordinary Things

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Let us come alive to the splendor that is all around us, and see the beauty in ordinary things.

— Thomas Merton

Written by MattAndJojang

June 25, 2014 at 9:41 am

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The Divine Comedy of Thomas Merton

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The Divine Comedy of Thomas Merton

In Theaters 2015

 

 

Who is Thomas Merton?

In 1941, aspiring author Thomas Merton abandoned his bohemian life in New York City and ran away to the strictest observance of Catholic monasticism he could find—a Trappist monastery in rural Kentucky, where he took a lifelong vow of silence, poverty, obedience and stability.


Considering the moral laxity of his past life, Merton felt that writing would be at odds with his new monastic vocation. But while he vowed to put down his pen for good, his abbot recognized Merton’s literary talent and demanded he write his life story. In obedience, Merton hammered out 
his autobiography, The Seven Storey Mountain, which was published in 1948. To Merton’s surprise, the book became a blockbuster hit and shot to the top of the New York Times bestseller list. It also sent scores of World War II veterans, students and even teenagers flocking to monasteries across the United States and around the world as they sought to follow Merton’s example. Despite his best efforts to submerge himself in the anonymity of his religious vocation, Thomas Merton had become an overnight celebrity.

Though bombarded with countless speaking requests and the other unwanted pressures of his newfound fame, Merton continued to write and publish many books on sacramental living, prayer and contemplation. As the Cold War and mounting fear of nuclear holocaust took center stage, Merton used his celebrity to speak out against war, violence, racism and other hot button issues of the 1960s. As a prominent peace activist and proponent of social justice amidst such turbulent times, Merton quickly became both loved and hated by many.

During his twenty-seven years as a monk, Merton published 56 books. Since then he has sold approximately 15 million books translated into dozens of languages. Merton’s influence has grown exponentially since his tragic and unexplained death by accidental electrocution in 1968. He is widely recognized as an important 20th-century Catholic mystic who forged new paths into both interfaith dialogue and non-violent peacemaking. In addition to the International Thomas Merton society, currently there are 57 local Thomas Merton chapters and societies around the globe dedicated to keeping his legacy alive.

 

About the Film

Synopsis

The Divine Comedy of Thomas Merton is a feature film about world famous monk and peace activist Thomas Merton. In the summer of 1966, Merton falls in love with a nursing student half his age, plunging him into the most agonizing predicament of his life. As he endeavors to prevent his secret romance from being discovered by his abbot, James Fox, Merton is brought to the brink of despair, realizing he must finally choose between serving himself or serving the world.

Endorsements

“A beautiful portrayal of one of the great spiritual masters of our time, “The Divine Comedy of Thomas Merton” highlights a period of tremendous creativity and volcanic change for the person who was, at the time, America’s most well known Catholic writer and sage. This lovely new screenplay ushers us into the often misunderstood world of monastic life, artfully showing the struggle of a man trying to remain faithful to his vows after having fallen in love. Both longtime fans of Merton and newcomers to his life will find it sensitive, nuanced and often deeply moving.”
James Martin, SJ, Jesuit priest and author of Becoming Who You Are: Insights on the True Self from Thomas Merton and Other Saints

“Thomas Merton is serving history as a ‘Prime Attractor’. He excites, challenges, and educates the hardest of hearts and the most rigid of minds from so many different spheres of life. He seduces people into a future where there is room and compassion for so much more. You can jump into that future through this fully entertaining but profoundly true account of his life.”
— Richard Rohr, Founder, Center for Action and Contemplation

“I found it very gripping — read it in one bite!”
 — Jim Forest, friend of Merton, writer, peace activist

“Thomas Merton deserves to be known and read by a new generation, and Ben Eisner and Kevin Miller are creating an ideal vehicle to make the introduction. Those who have read Merton will find much here to deepen their understanding of the man, and those who haven’t read him will want to as soon as they leave the theater.
— Brian D. McLaren, author/speaker/activist (www.brianmclaren.net)

“The Divine Comedy of Thomas Merton narrates with respect and humor significant events in the famous monk’s last years that challenged his personal integrity and his crucial relationship to his monastery’s abbot, James Fox. The screenplay realistically portrays the major role that Fox played in Merton’s life both as a down-to-earth spiritual mentor and as one of his literary career’s best friends. The screenplay follows Merton’s movement through personal challenges to his living out his vocation in a context of crisis that is mirrored in events of the Sixties that created turbulence for America’s own sense of its direction through world upheaval. This script deserves serious consideration for translation into a film that would attract a global audience.”
— Jonathan Montaldo, co-editor of The Intimate Merton

— Source: http://mertonmovie.com